Blog Topic: ICYMI

Sam Lipkin and Seline Haze

The sixth annual Athens Hip Hop Awards took place last night, with this year’s event placing a special emphasis on activism. Local performers, politicians and community organizers gathered for a full evening of music and much more, in an effort to celebrate local hip hop and the community that supports it.

Read more about the awards here. Below, check out this year’s winners:

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Eureka California

Just as Athens’ event calendar revs up to full speed this time of year, local bands seem to drop new music left and right at the first signs of springtime. To wit, here are three recent tunes from across the stylistic spectrum, each of which is worthy of your attention.

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It’s the Year of the Dog—or Dawg, if you prefer—and the State Botanical Garden helped usher in the lunar new year with a celebration Saturday featuring crafts, food, storytelling, music and more.

Flagpole photographer Jessica Silverman captured the festivities, but if you missed them, don’t worry: more are on the way, thanks to a Big Read project sponsored by the University of Georgia Department of Language and Literacy Education and the National Endowment for the Arts. This year’s Big Read is based around To Live by Yu Hua and the work of the young-adult novelist Grace Lin.

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After a day of service and other Martin Luther King Jr. Day activities, thousands of Athens residents gathered downtown for the second annual MLK Day parade, organized by the Athens Anti-Discrimination Coalition. Hundreds marched while a diverse group of thousands more watched, and the parade was followed by a festival with kids’ activities, a market for black-owned businesses, food trucks and live music at the Hot Corner, historically Athens’ center of African-American life.

Flagpole photographer Nicole Adamson documented the scene:

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The Downtown Parade of Lights is perennially one of the most family-friendly and diverse events in Athens, and this year was no different. Sure, there were a few hiccups—one of George Bugg’s classic cars stalled out with Mayor Nancy Denson riding shotgun; a runaway camel that wasn’t really feeling being dressed like a dinosaur—but in the end, a good time was had by all. Except this little girl:

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In response to the shooting at a church in Texas on Nov. 5 that killed 26 people, members of the Georgia chapter of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America gathered at City Hall in Athens on Saturday for a vigil for the victims, as well as a call to action.

The event, deeply rooted in faith, began at First A.M.E. Church before marchers made their way through downtown to City Hall. Many of the roughly 40 people held signs calling for an end to gun violence and a repeal of Georgia’s campus carry law. During the procession, the group sang in unison, and was greeted by a church choir on the front steps of City Hall.

At City Hall, state Rep. Spencer Frye (D-Athens) and others local leaders and gun safety advocates spoke to the crowd about the need for a solution to gun violence.

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It seems former R.E.M. frontman Michael Stipe’s favorite mode of performance these days is the pop-up solo covers set, whether he’s opening for Patti Smith or paying tribute to David Bowie.

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With the Nov. 7 special election drawing nearer, the candidates for state House districts 117 and 119 met Monday night for one final forum, organized by the Athens-Clarke County Federation of Neighborhoods at the ACC Library.

Candidates running in both districts responded to prepared questions from a Federation representative; much to the disappointment of both attendees and some of the candidates, they did not field questions from the audience, nor did they debate the topics.

Republican Houston Gaines and Democrat Deborah Gonzalez took to the stage first, starting out with their legislative priorities. For Gaines, that includes fostering business and economic growth while addressing education and transportation issues; for Gonzalez, improvements to education and public health, she said, would lead to improvements in other areas as well, including crime and mass incarceration.

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Halloween came early on Sunday as hundreds of people lined the boulevards of Boulevard for the second annual Boo-le-Bark dog parade. Costumed canines and their humans enjoyed popsicles, food-truck munchies, iced coffee and music from the Rev. Connor Tribble at Jittery Joe’s Roasting Co., all to benefit Athens Pets, a local organization that places lost and abandoned animals with new homes. Flagpole intern Nicole Adamson was there to document the decorated doggos.

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With Hurricane Irma looming, hundreds of people still turned out for the annual Athens PRIDE Festival—the culmination of PRIDE Week—featuring music, speakers, local businesses and political groups, and a drag show. Flagpole photo intern Jessica Silverman documented the scene.

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Removing a lane from Chase Street has caused traffic to back up at the Loop.

Athens-Clarke County officials said Wednesday they will restripe part of Chase Street between the Loop and Newton Bridge Road, returning it to four lanes.

But that may not be the last change to the street, according to ACC Transportation and Public Works Director Drew Raessler. A consultant hired to update the county’s bike and pedestrian master plan will produce a Complete Streets study of the corridor in November.

“We can’t simply go back and say ‘that’s it,’ in my opinion,” Raessler said.

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In spite of a storm that leveled dozens of trees and left thousands without power on Saturday, the Star-Spangled Classic went on. Entertainment included a fireworks show downtown, and Flagpole contributing photographer Richard Hamm was there:

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There’s a new holiday in Athens, but it’s one that’s been around for 152 years.

For Athens, that day is May 4, the day in 1865 when the Union army arrived and freed the slaves in town and the surrounding countryside, who then gathered with their loved ones at the town hall, hoisting a flag up what they then deemed the “flagpole of liberty.”

While many marches that take place downtown are in protest, Thursday’s vigil and rally marking the “day of jubilee” was one of celebration and honoring ancestors.

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ACC Commissioner Melissa Link with our congressman’s feathered avatar.

On one of the busiest spring Saturdays in Athens, 100 people attended a town hall for District 10 congressman Jody Hice. The one notable absence was Hice himself.

Michael Goltzer of Athens was one of several people who addressed a photo of Rep. Hice (R-Social Circle) propped up in a chair on the stage of the Athens Regional Library on Apr. 22. He pointed out that the town hall was the most basic form of democratic conversation and lamented Hice’s refusal to engage with his constituents.

“Just tell us what we have to do to get you to meet with us,” he said.

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Means speaks at a public forum Monday night at Whitehead Road Elementary School.

Speaking to an audience of Athens parents, teachers and concerned citizens for the first time, Demond Means, the sole finalist for Clarke County school superintendent, described himself as someone who’s committed to social justice, marginalized students and raising his family in Clarke County.

The board is expected to formally appoint Means today after a public forum Monday night.

Although Means has been superintendent of a smaller, largely white and affluent district in suburban Milwaukee for nine years, he was raised in inner-city Milwaukee and graduated from public schools there.

One of the reasons he felt drawn to Clarke County, he said, is the opportunity to help minority and low-income students. (CCSD is 79 percent minority, and more than 80 percent of students qualified for free or reduced-price lunches before a USDA grant made them free for everyone.)

“I firmly believe our most marginalized children deserve the most attention,” he said. “Those children who don’t have an advocate in the superintendent’s office or other places are the ones who need us the most.”

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The fifth annual Chess and Community conference Saturday at the Georgia Center featured entrepreneur Beau Shell (the Lil’ Ice Cream Dude), journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault (who integrated the University of Georgia) and a tournament between the Classic City Knights youth chess team and local police officers.

Here’s a video by Flagpole senior staff photographer Joshua L. Jones featuring Chess and Community founder Lemuel “Life the Griot” LaRoche.

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The Clarke County School District held its first-ever Maker Faire Saturday afternoon at Clarke Central High School. The event featured more than 100 students from all 21 CCSD schools, including exhibits on arts and crafts, 3D printing, film, music, drones, robots, science, engineering, agriculture and more. All photos by Flagpole contributing photographer Austin Steele.

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As more than 1 million women (and men) marched on Washington, D.C. Jan. 21, Athens was having its own women’s march, which drew several hundred people to the Classic Center—home of the Athena statue—in spite of being somewhat hastily organized.

Reader Brendan Vaganek was kind enough to send along photos of some of his favorite signs:

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Several hundred students, professors and community members gathered on Friday at 11:45 a.m.—the same moment that President Donald Trump was inaugurated into office—to voice opposition to the incoming administration. “Walk Out” protestors met in groups at the main library on the University of Georgia’s North Campus and the ROTC building on South Campus. Two parades of black-clad marchers then made their way to the rendezvous point at Tate Plaza.

Real Food & Amnesty, the Lambda Alliance, the Women’s Studies Student Organization, the UGA National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Undocumented Student Alliance, Students for Justice in Palestine and Athens for Everyone had representatives speak to a crowd that continued to grow. The black clothes of the marchers eventually mingled with the plainclothes passersby who were drawn to stay, some out of solidarity, some out of curiosity.

“We were hoping for a good turnout; this is an amazing turnout,” said Adwoa Agyepong, co-president of Amnesty International at UGA.

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Jesse Houle fires up the crowd at the City Hall before the march starts.

On an unseasonably warm night for mid-January, a makeshift band, giant bird puppets and a crowd of thousands gathered around Athens City Hall in protest of newly inaugurated President Donald Trump, filling in every inch of space from Washington Street to Hancock Avenue and from College Avenue to the City Hall doors.

At what might be the largest march in Athens history, the Day of Resistance drew an estimated 2,500–4,500 attendees, according to Athens for Everyone, who helped organize it.

While the march was organized in response to the inauguration of Trump, it was not specific to one cause. Speakers included representatives from U-Lead Athens, an organization for undocumented students; The Cottage, a nonprofit that assists sexual assault survivors; Students for Justice in Palestine and Athens for Everyone.

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Former R.E.M. singer Michael Stipe speaks with parade organizer Mokah Jasmine Johnson after the Athens in Harmony concert at the 40 Watt Club Monday night.

Athens’ first-ever Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade drew several thousand people downtown on Monday to enjoy not only marching bands and classic cars, but food trucks, kids’ activities, live music and more. Flagpole photographer Joshua L. Jones was there to capture the event. [Blake Aued]

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Ludacris performs at G-Day.

As the Flagpole staff takes a much-needed break over the holidays, we’re reposting 11 of our most popular, most important, funniest and/or otherwise noteworthy stories of this most dismal of years. Look for a new post each day through Jan. 2.

New Georgia head football coach Kirby Smart wanted to bring 90,000 fans to Athens for the Bulldogs’ annual spring practice game, and what better way to do it than to hire gazillion-selling rapper Ludacris to perform on G-Day?

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This is a locally owned business.

As the Flagpole staff takes a much-needed break over the holidays, we’re reposting 11 of our most popular, most important, funniest and/or otherwise noteworthy stories of this most dismal of years. Look for a new post each day through Jan. 2.

In August, a UGA student wrote a dumb column for The Red & Black about how students prefer chains to local businesses. It outraged a lot of people, and I was bored, so I wrote a takedown that wound up being the most-read article on our website of the whole year. Read it again here.

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As the Flagpole staff takes a much-needed break over the holidays, we’re reposting 11 of our most popular, most important, funniest and/or otherwise noteworthy stories of this most dismal of years. Look for a new post each day through Jan. 2.

Illustrator Jack Davis—a UGA graduate renowned for his satirical cartoons in Mad magazine as well as his popular Georgia Bulldog-themed drawings—died July 27 at the age of 91. From Arts Editor Jessica Smith’s obituary:

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Tituss Burgess on “The Late Show.”

As the Flagpole staff takes a much-needed break over the holidays, we’re reposting 11 of our most popular, most important, funniest and/or otherwise noteworthy stories of this most dismal of years. Look for a new post each day through Jan. 2.

It didn’t rise to the level of R.E.M.’s feud with Donald Trump in 2015, but two celebrities with Athens ties—Drive-By Truckers frontman Patterson Hood and actor Tituss Burgess—both mixed it up with the powers that be in 2016, and judging by the online traffic, Flagpole readers loved it.

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Mokah Jasmine Johnson talks with ACCPD Capt. Mark Magnuson during a Black Lives Matter rally in July.

As the Flagpole staff takes a much-needed break over the holidays, we’re reposting 11 of our most popular, most important, funniest and/or otherwise noteworthy stories of this most dismal of years. Look for a new post each day through Jan. 2.

A new voice emerged in local politics in 2016—a year when blue-on-black violence continued to roil the nation. Hip-hop promoters Mokah Jasmine Johnson and her husband, Knowa, spoke up with a message of peace and harmony in a city that too often ignores its racial fault lines.

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As the Flagpole staff takes a much-needed break over the holidays, we’re reposting 11 of our most popular, most important, funniest and/or otherwise noteworthy stories of this most dismal of years. Look for a new post each day through Jan. 2.

Indie South Fair has long drawn artists and craftsmen not only from Athens, but all over the Southeast. So it made sense for founder Serra Ferguson to take her show on the road.

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As the Flagpole staff takes a much-needed break over the holidays, we’re reposting 11 of our most popular, most important, funniest and/or otherwise noteworthy stories of this most dismal of years. Look for a new post each day through Jan. 2.

One could say—fine, I’m saying it—that the Athens music scene has east and west poles, not north and south: The 40 Watt Club at Washington and Pulaski, and Wuxtry Records at Clayton and College. At one of these places (or in the few blocks in between) is where most of the great music in this town has been made and heard for decades.

The venerable record store, which has nurtured former clerks and future stars like Kate Pierson, Peter Buck, Brian “Danger Mouse” Burton and John Fernandes, turned 40 this year:

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As the Flagpole staff takes a much-needed break over the holidays, we’re reposting 11 of our most popular, most important, funniest and/or otherwise noteworthy stories of this most dismal of years. Look for a new post each day through Jan. 2.

It almost seems like a minor issue now, given what’s about to be unleashed by the Trump Administration, but last spring UGA was up in arms (bad pun intended) about a bill to legalize guns on college campuses.

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From left, Barbie, Gabbi Markle, Elsa and Sanjana Ramesh.

As the Flagpole staff takes a much-needed break over the holidays, we’re reposting 11 of our most popular, most important, funniest and/or otherwise noteworthy stories of this most dismal of years. Look for a new post each day through Jan. 2.

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As the Flagpole staff takes a much-needed break over the holidays, we’re reposting 11 of our most popular, most important, funniest and/or otherwise noteworthy stories of this most dismal of years. Look for a new post each day through Jan. 2.

Yes, Winterville’s mayor literally rocks. The small town just outside of Athens elected renowned local roots-rocker Dodd Ferrelle mayor last year, and he took office in January with big plans to turn the sleepy ‘burg into a regional destination for arts and music.

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As the Flagpole staff takes a much-needed break over the holidays, we’re reposting 11 of our most popular, most important, funniest and/or otherwise noteworthy stories of this most dismal of years. Look for a new post each day through Jan. 2.

Ten years ago, any band with even a drop of indie cred would’ve been called a sellout for selling a song to a car company. In today’s fractured media landscape—where everything is supposed to be “free” and the radio only plays that one song over and over—a TV commercial is about the only way musicians can put their music in front of consumers and make a nice check in the process.

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Athens-Clarke County officials and scores of parents and children braved frigid weather Friday to celebrate the re-opening of the all-new World of Wonder playground at Southeast Clarke Park.

The 2.5 acre playground is a replacement for the original World of Wonder, Athens’ first “destination playground,” which drew people not only from all over the county, but the region as well.

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On last night’s “The Late Show,” Michael Stipe joined host Stephen Colbert for a rendition of the R.E.M. classic “It’s the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine).” Sort of, anyway.

While 2016 may have seemed like the end of the world, Colbert changed the lyrics to “It’s the End of the Year as We Know It,” rattling off a list of 2016’s notable (and mostly depressing) happenings, from Putin’s election hack to Harambe, as a disgusted-looking Stipe—still sporting his Santa Claus beard—looks on.

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As you go to vote today (and you are voting, right?), be aware that several polling places in Athens have changed.

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MSNBC’s Kate Snow interviewed Athens-based band the Drive-By Truckers Tuesday afternoon at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Co-frontman Patterson Hood addressed party unity, saying that he’s now backing the party’s nominee, Hillary Clinton, after supporting Bernie Sanders initially.

“It’s what needs to happen. The stakes are too high right now to sit around and cry because our first choice didn’t get to go on the way. I’m definitely totally on board” with Hillary Clinton, Hood said.

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“We’re going streaking to the poke stop!”

As we say in the journalism business, “two is a trend,” and so it’s officially a trend that UGA bros are getting hella faded and running around in public without any clothes on.

Actually, “turnt” might be the better word to describe the 22-year-old UGA senior who jumped into the back of a garbage truck downtown while naked on May 29. (IDK, somebody look it up on Urban Dictionary for me; I’m old and don’t know how to use the Google.)

It took four police officers to drag Benjamin Abele out of the truck because he “violently fought them off, and… it was difficult to get a hold of him because he was extremely slick from being coated with a foul-smelling liquid,” according to the Athens Banner-Herald. He was shot with a Taser twice with no effect.

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That’s Dr. Ryan Seacrest to you.

The “American Idol” host, media mogul and philanthropist—who dropped out of school after his freshman year to go to Hollywood—told graduates to follow their dreams during his UGA commencement speech Friday.

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First-round pick Leonard Floyd celebrates against Clemson.

Georgia’s lackluster 2015 season wasn’t for lack of professional-level talent. Five former Bulldogs were taken in the NFL draft, which wrapped up on Saturday.

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Photo Credit: “The Late Show” via Twitter

Athens native Tituss Burgess, star of Netflix’s “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” had some harsh words for his home state during an appearance on “The Late Show” Friday.

The Emmy-nominated actor, who graduated from Cedar Shoals High School and the University of Georgia, told host Stephen Colbert that he wants to give a commencement speech at UGA. The hypothetical speech, he said, would take aim at student apathy and the “religious liberty” bill passed by the state legislature but vetoed by Gov. Nathan Deal last month. He gave Colbert’s audience a preview:

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The “campus carry” bill allowing guns on most parts of the University of Georgia campus—including classrooms and professors’ offices—will have a chilling effect on academic freedom and debate, UGA law professor Sonja West argues in an article for the website Slate posted today.

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Hundreds, if not thousands, of people congregated on College Avenue outside City Hall Saturday afternoon for the Athens Downtown Development Authority’s food truck festival, which drew almost a dozen food trucks from Atlanta (as well as a local truck or two). Flagpole photographer Joshua L. Jones documented the scene.

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Sightings of a psychedelic school bus in downtown Athens this weekend prompted questions from locals about what it is.

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George’s Low Country Table pulls their bison spare ribs from a pot during an Iron Chef-style cooking competition.

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The health care industry is changing, and Athens Regional Health System CEO Charles Peck sees two options: Keep the status quo and possibly shrink, or find a “strategic partner” and grow.

The Affordable Care Act has hastened consolidation among health insurers, and fewer and larger insurance providers means that hospitals are at a disadvantage when negotiating reimbursement rates. Costs are rising, though more slowly than before the ACA took effect. Patients are looking more to outpatient care.

Then there was the botched new electronic medical record system installed under former CEO Jamey Thaw, who resigned last year. Peck, who was hired in February, acknowledges that implementation was “rough,” but also says media coverage was overblown. That coverage made potential patients (read: customers) think twice about seeking treatment at ARMC.

“People in the community probably started wondering whether this was the place to come at that time,” Peck said.

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Chants of “Bernie! Bernie!” rang loud as residents of Athens-Clarke County joined millions of people around the country by starting a grassroots committee in support of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) for the upcoming 2016 Presidential Election.

The committee had their first meeting Saturday at the Blind Pig Tavern before splitting up into subcommittees to focus on campaigning for Sanders, who identifies as a socialist but caucuses with Democrats. He’s running against Hillary Clinton and former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley for the nomination.

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The bells kept ringing at the Lyndon House on Thursday night. “Are they making an announcement?” one woman asked me. Nothing ensued, and we were all easily pulled back into our animated conversations. The bells rang again. Eventually the noise of the crowd drowned the ringing out entirely, as hundreds had gathered to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Lyndon House Art Center’s Juried Exhibition.

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Robyn Hitchcock and Emma Swift played The Foundry Friday evening. Below, check out a selection of photographs from the show.

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“Comply and complain” was the refrain police used over and over again during a town hall meeting with local law enforcement on Saturday.

A panel of community leaders briefly tackled a number of important issues—gentrification, low voter turnout, lack of minority representation in government—but in the wake of recent high-profile cases where police killed African Americans, the No.1 concern was the police department’s relationship with minorities.

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A friendly reminder: The Athens-Clarke County Board of Elections (155 E. Washington St., next to City Hall) will open for early voting this weekend—including Sunday for the first time ever. Hours are 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday and 1–5 p.m. Sunday.

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Beloved local rock and roll institution The Glands returned to the stage Saturday after a two-year hiatus (which was preceded by a one-year hiatus, which was preceded by a seven-year hiatus…), and they played. Boy, did they play. Thirty-six songs, in fact.

The setlist, which spanned the band’s career and teased unreleased material from a long-awaited third record, which frontman Ross Shapiro confirmed to Flagpole will be out within the year, is now streamable via Southern Shelter. Check it out below.

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A video of a journalist being forcibly removed from a Republican campaign event in Dawsonville has drawn a lot of attention lately. Lost in the shuffle, according to Democrat Michelle Nunn’s Senate campaign, were her opponent David Perdue’s comment on the unemployment rate at the 37-minute mark.

Team Nunn is circulating a Huffington Post article about the event that quotes Perdue as saying he’s not concerned about Georgia’s 7.8 percent unemployment rate, which is the second highest of any state and well above the 6.2 percent national average.

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Josh Murray, bachelor no more.

It’s a big day here in Athens as a former Bulldog, Josh Murray, made headlines last night for stealing the heart of one Andi Dorfman on ABC’s “The Bachelorette.”

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Creature Comforts Brewery.

The Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation hosted its 45th Annual Preservation Awards at the historic Morton Theatre on Monday, June 2.

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Director of National Intelligence James Clapper expressed discontent that many college applicants are starting to mention Edward Snowden as their personal hero, describing his leaks as “the most massive and damaging theft in our country’s history.” Clapper defended the right of whistleblowing but contended that Snowden does not deserve the label because he did not report his concerns up the chain of command, to Congress or to the Justice Department.

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Here’s what y’all thought were the most 10 interesting stories of the year.

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Image credit: ducksizedhorses via reddit.com/r/uga

Like the Force, Flagpole’s man-crush on University of Georgia wide receiver Chris Conley grows stronger every day.

The self-described nerd recently sat down with the Macon Telegraph’s Seth Emerson to talk… and talk… and talk about his Star Wars fandom and plans to shoot an epic light saber duel on campus sometime next year.

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Apparently folks quit drinking after the zombie apocalypse.

On last night’s Season Four premiere of “The Walking Dead,” Daryl and a crew of prison newcomers raid a grocery store for supplies. The store was full of prominently-placed cases of Georgia craft beer, including Athens’ own Terrapin Rye.

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This hilarious bit of news is being picked up by everyone from Creative Loafing to TMZ, but it’s worth noting that the original scoop came from Starcasm, whose source was none other than Athens’ Uncle Pizza, aka Jubee of Jubee and the Morning After. Because he was there, for some reason.

After earnest, old-timey-ish folk-rock outfit Mumford & Sons played Centennial Olympic Park Tuesday night, they did what all celebrities visiting Atlanta do: they ate at Antico went to the Clermont Lounge, that dimly lit bastion of middle-aged stripperdom.

Read on after the jump.

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In the slim chance it’s not the only thing on your Facebook timeline right now, we thought we’d alert you to this new New York Times travel feature titled, “In Athens, Ga., a Downtown Renaissance.”

The six-frame slideshow cites several local businesses—including The World Famous, Community and The Branded Butcher—as evidence of Athens’ cultural uprising. The town “feels like your favorite, secret neighborhood, where iconic locales dovetail with new and resurrected music spaces, boutiques, lounges and restaurants,” reads the intro.

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Titus Andronicus’ Athens show last month ended with singer/guitarist/weight-of-the-world-carrier Patrick Stickles (who, by the way, seems like a really fun guy who would not at all ruin your BBQ) berating audience members and ranting about slavery. It was weird.

Shortly after, Impose Magazine caught up with the outspoken frontman to ask about the show, where a concertgoer passed out mini-Confederate flags in an apparent attempt to troll the politically-minded group, whose breakthrough album The Monitor was based on the Civil War.

Stickles, who spends a fair amount of time in the interview talking about how “Irish” and “punk” he is, casts his ire far and wide, complaining about the Georgia Theare staff (they “weren’t giving me the things I needed to do my job effectively and give the kids their money’s worth”); the crowd (“by the end of the show it’s a bunch of fucking bros beating on each other in some kind of weird, homoerotic ritual”); the perpetrator (“I was ready to choke him out. I don’t know what I would have done if I hadn’t been tied down to the guitar.”); and a host of others.

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Free this afternoon? Why not go to Suwanee to support high-speed rail through Athens?

The only public hearing in Georgia is at 4 p.m. today at Suwanee City Hall, 323 Buford Highway.

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In this week’s Sunday paper, The New York Times published a good-natured fluff piece on the longtime fantasy sports obsession of one Mike Mills, former bassist for R.E.M. and occasional solo performer. Among the takeaways:

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If you were convinced, as was I, that Dodd Ferrelle and S.N.I.P.A.’s “Go Dawgs (Sic ‘Em Woof Woof Woof)” represented the glorious pinnacle of UGA-football-anthem inanity, it’s time to readjust your worldview.

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In case you haven’t heard by now, the highlight of Coachella this past weekend was not, as you might expect, a live performance, but the unveiling of a minute-and-a-half teaser for Daft Punk’s hotly anticipated new album, Random Access Memories (out May 21).

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On Tuesday, Atlanta noise-rock outfit Deerhunter was the musical guest on “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon,” and the band played the title track from its upcoming album, Monomania. It was a hell of a performance: aside from the hedonistic, scuzzed-out glory of the tune itself, frontman Bradford Cox (an Athens native) appeared as a bandaged-up version of his new alter ego Connie Lungpin, sauntering off stage near the end of the song and wandering down a 30 Rock hallway, eventually pausing to wait for an elevator.

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